14 February

Galleries & Museums
7 Galleria Monica De Cardenas
27 ZERO...
20 Pirelli HangarBicocca
21 Fondazione Prada
5 Galleria Raffaella Cortese
14 Gió Marconi
18 Francesca Minini
31 Fondazione Marconi
33 Galleria Federico​ ​Vavassori
8 Massimo De Carlo
11 Istituto Svizzero
23 Federica Schiavo Gallery
30 Clima
12 kaufmann repetto
32 VISTAMARESTUDIO
Show
Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

Open map
ZERO...

Via Carlo Boncompagni, 44, 20139

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

Open map
Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

Open map
Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

Open map
Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

Open map
Fondazione Marconi

Via Tadino 15, 20124

Open map
Galleria Federico​ ​Vavassori

Via G. Giulini 5, 20213

Open map
Massimo De Carlo

Palazzo Belgioioso Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

Open map
Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

Open map
Federica Schiavo Gallery

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

Open map
Clima

Via ​A. Stradella, 5​, 20129

Open map
kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

Open map
VISTAMARESTUDIO

Viale Vittorio Veneto 30​, 20124

Open map
Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

Open map
kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

Open map
Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

Open map
Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

Open map
Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

Open map
Massimo De Carlo

Casa Corbellini-Wassermann, Viale Lombardia 17 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

Open map
Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

Open map
Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

Open map
Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

Open map
La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

Open map
ZERO...

Via Carlo Boncompagni, 44, 20139

Open map
Marsèlleria

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

Open map
Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

Open map
Fanta-MLN

Via Merano 21, 20127

Open map
Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

Open map
MEGA

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

Open map
Federica Schiavo Gallery

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

Open map
Cortesi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

Open map
Clima

Via ​A. Stradella, 5​, 20129

Open map
Fondazione Marconi

Via Tadino 15, 20124

Open map
VISTAMARESTUDIO

Viale Vittorio Veneto 30​, 20124

Open map
Il Colorificio

Via Giambellino 71, 20146

Open map
Fondazione ICA Milano

Via Orobia 26, 20139

Open map
10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

Open map
Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

Open map
La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

Open map
Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

Open map
Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

Open map
Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

Open map
Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

Open map
Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

Open map
Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

Open map
Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

Open map
La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

Open map
Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

Open map
Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

Open map
Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

Open map
Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

Open map
Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

Open map
Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

Open map
Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

Open map
Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

Open map
Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

Open map
DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

Open map
Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

Open map
Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

Open map
CONVERSO

CLS Architetti - San Paolo Converso Piazza S. Eufemia, Milano - 20122

Open map
​LùBar

Via Palestro, 16 - 20121

Open map
Zazà Ramen

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

Open map
Close

Federico Tosi
Goodbye bye bye

30 November – 23 February
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am – 7 pm (closed 1 – 3 pm) / Sat. 12 – 7 pm

Opening 29 November from 6.30 pm

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Diego Marcon

19 January – 23 February
Tuesday – Friday | 11 am - 7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)
Saturday 3-7 pm

Opening 19 January from 11 am to 6 pm

Via Carlo Boncompagni, 44, 20139

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Mario Merz “Igloos”
Curated by Vicente Todolí

25 October – 24 February
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 24 October from 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

View more on Artshell

 

Curated by Vicente Todolí, Artistic Director of Pirelli HangarBicocca and realised in collaboration with Fondazione Merz, the exhibition spans the whole 5,500 square metres of the Navate and the Cubo of Pirelli HangarBicocca, placing the visitor at the heart of a constellation of over 30 large-scale works in the shape of an igloo: an unprecedented landscape of great visual impact.

 

Fifty years since the creation of the first igloo, the exhibition provides an overview of Mario Merz’s work, of its historical importance and great innovative reach. Gathered from numerous private collections and international museums, including the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid, the Tate Modern in London, the Hamburger Bahnhof in Berlin and the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, the ‘igloos’ will be displayed together in such a large number for the first time.

 

Vicente Todolí said, “As its starting point, the exhibition ‘Igloos’ takes Mario Merz’s solo show curated by Harald Szeemann in 1985 at the Kunsthaus in Zurich, where all the types of igloos produced up until that point were brought together to be arranged ‘as a village, a town, a ‘Città irreale’ in the large exhibition hall,’ as Szeemann states. Our exhibition at Pirelli HangarBicocca will be a once-in-a-generation opportunity to re-live that experience (but expanded from 17 to more than 30 igloos) created by one of the most important artists of the post-war generation.”

 

The Milan project builds on Szeemann and Merz’s intention, highlighting how the artist continued to develop his igloo imagery with coherence and vision. The exhibition in fact also includes works conceived over the following decades, on the occasion of his major anthological and retrospective shows in the leading museums in Europe and around the world. The show opens with La Goccia d’Acqua, 1987, twelve meters in diameter, it is the largest igloo ever produced by Merz for an internal exhibition space, and was conceived on the occasion of his solo show at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux.

 

In the space of the Navate, the exhibition itinerary unfolds through sets displayed in chronological order, starting from the first igloos conceived in the ’60s such as, to name but a few: Igloo di Giap, 1968, and Acqua scivola, 1969. Among those of the ’70s, Igloo di Marisa, 1972 and ‘If the hoar frost grip thy tent Thou wilt give thanks when night is spent’ (Ezra Pund), 1978 are featured here. The evolutions of the ’80s, the period in which the igloos become more complex, doubling, tripling or intersecting, are represented by works such as: Igloo del Palacio de las Alhajas, 1982 and Chiaro Oscuro, 1983. Representative of the ’90s is the Senza titolo, 1999, created for the museum park on the occasion of the solo show at the Fundação de Serralves, also curated by Vicente Todolí.

 

Through this group of works, the exhibition reveals the most innovative aspects and themes of Merz’s research, inserting it within the international contemporary artistic panorama of the last 50 years, through the use of natural and industrial materials, the poetic and evocative deployment of the written word and the dialog with the surrounding space and architecture.

 

Mario Merz’s practice developed in Turin from the ’50s onwards. A key figure of Arte Povera, he was one of the very first in Italy to use the installation medium, breaking through the two-dimensional nature of the picture by including neon tubes in his canvases and in everyday objects, such as umbrellas and glasses.

 

Through his work, he investigates and represents the processes of transformation of nature and human life, using elements from the scientific-mathematical field, such as the spiral and the Fibonacci sequence, and, from 1968, introducing what would remain one of the recurring and most representative motifs of his practice for more than 30 years: the igloo.

 

These works, visually traceable to primordial habitations, become for the artist the archetype of inhabited places and of the world, as well as a metaphor for the various relationships between interior and exterior, between physical and conceptual space, between individuality and collectivity. His Igloos are characterized by a metallic structure coated in a great variety of common materials, such as clay, glass, stone, jute, and steel—often leaning or intertwined in an unstable fashion—and by the use of neon elements and wording.

 

The delicate precariousness of these installations takes on major symbolic importance, sometimes a political one, opening up to the artist’s reflection on contemporary living, as Merz himself states: “the igloo is a home, a temporary shelter. Since I consider that ultimately, today, we live in a very temporary era, for me the sense of the temporary coincides with this name: igloo” (Mario Merz, taken from “In Prima Persona. Pittori e scultori italiani: Mario Merz, Giulio Paolini, Mimmo Spadini, Alighiero Boetti” by Antonia Mulas, broadcast on RAI Tre on 12/25/1984).

 

 

Pirelli HangarBicocca presenta “Igloos”, la mostra dedicata a Mario Merz (Milano 1925-2003), tra gli artisti più rilevanti del secondo dopoguerra, riunendo il corpus delle sue opere più iconiche, gli igloo, datati tra il 1968 e l’anno della sua scomparsa.

 

Il progetto espositivo, curato da Vicente Todolí e realizzato in collaborazione con la Fondazione Merz, si espande nei 5.500 metri quadrati delle Navate e del Cubo di Pirelli HangarBicocca e pone il visitatore al centro di una costellazione di oltre trenta opere di grandi dimensioni a forma di igloo, un paesaggio inedito dal forte impatto visivo.

 

A cinquant’anni dalla creazione del primo igloo, la mostra offre l’occasione per osservare lavori di Mario Merz di importanza storica e dalla portata innovativa, provenienti da numerose collezioni private e museali internazionali – tra cui il Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía di Madrid, la Tate Modern di Londra, l’Hamburger Bahnhof di Berlino e il Van Abbemuseum di Eindhoven –, raccolti ed esposti insieme per la prima volta in Italia.

 

La mostra “Igloos” assume come punto di partenza l’esposizione personale di Mario Merz curata da Harald Szeemann nel 1985 alla Kunsthaus di Zurigo dove vennero presentate tutte le tipologie di igloo realizzate fino a quel momento “al fine di formare un villaggio, un paese, una ‘Città irreale’ nello spazio espositivo”, come afferma Szeemann, L’esposizione in Pirelli HangarBicocca è un’occasione unica per rivivere quell’esperienza (ora estesa da 17 a più di 30 igloo), pensata da uno dei più importanti artisti del secondo dopo guerra. (Vicente Todolí).

 

Il progetto di Milano prosegue l’intento di Szeemann e Merz, mettendo in luce come l’artista abbia continuato a sviluppare con coerenza e visionarietà l’immaginario dell’igloo. L’esposizione include infatti anche opere concepite nei decenni successivi, in occasione di importanti antologiche e retrospettive nei grandi musei europei e stranieri. Si apre con La Goccia d’Acqua, 1987, il più grande igloo mai realizzato da Merz per uno spazio interno, di dodici metri di diametro, presentato in occasione della sua mostra personale al CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux.

 

Nello spazio delle Navate il percorso espositivo si sviluppa in nuclei che seguono un ordine cronologico, partendo dai primi igloo concepiti negli anni ‘60 come, per citarne alcuni: Igloo di Giap, 1968 e Acqua scivola, 1969. Quelli degli anni ‘70: tra gli altri, sono presenti Igloo di Marisa, 1972 e ‘If the hoar frost grip thy tent Thou wilt give thanks when night is spent’ (Ezra Pound), 1978. Le evoluzioni degli anni ‘80, periodo in cui gli igloo divengono più complessi, si raddoppiano, si triplicano o si intersecano, sono testimoniate da, ad esempio: Igloo del Palacio de las Alhajas, 1982 e Chiaro Oscuro, 1983. Rappresentativo degli anni ‘90 è Senza titolo, 1999, realizzato per il parco del museo, in occasione della mostra personale alla Fundação de Serralves, curata proprio da Vicente Todolí.

Attraverso questo gruppo di opere la mostra rivela gli aspetti e i temi più innovativi di Merz, inserendo la sua ricerca all’interno del panorama artistico internazionale e contemporaneo degli ultimi cinquant’anni, come: l’utilizzo di materiali naturali e industriali, l’impiego poetico ed evocativo della parola scritta e il dialogo con lo spazio circostante e la sua architettura.

 

La pratica di Mario Merz si sviluppa a Torino fin dagli anni ‘50. Figura chiave dell’Arte Povera, è uno degli antesignani in Italia a utilizzare l’installazione, superando la bidimensionalità del quadro, inserendo tubi al neon nelle sue tele e in oggetti quotidiani come ombrelli e bicchieri.

Attraverso il suo lavoro indaga e rappresenta i processi di trasformazione della natura e della vita umana, utilizzando elementi provenienti dall’ambito scientifico-matematico, come la spirale e la sequenza numerica di Fibonacci, e introducendo a partire dal 1968 quello che rimarrà uno dei motivi ricorrenti e più rappresentativi della sua pratica per oltre trent’anni: l’igloo.

 

Queste opere, riconducibili visivamente alle primordiali abitazioni, diventano per l’artista l’archetipo dei luoghi abitati e del mondo e la metafora delle diverse relazioni tra interno ed esterno, tra spazio fisico e spazio concettuale, tra individualità e collettività. Gli igloo sono caratterizzati da una struttura metallica rivestita da una grande varietà di materiali di uso comune, come argilla, vetro, pietre, iuta e acciaio – spesso appoggiati o incastrati tra loro in modo instabile – e dall’uso di elementi e scritte al neon.

 

La delicata precarietà di queste installazioni assume una forte valenza simbolica, talvolta politica, aprendo a una riflessione dell’artista sulla vita contemporanea, come afferma Merz stesso: “l’igloo è una casa, una casa provvisoria. Siccome io considero che in fondo oggi noi viviamo in un’epoca molto provvisoria, il senso del provvisorio per me ha coinciso con questo nome: igloo” (Mario Merz, estratto da “In Prima Persona. Pittori e scultori italiani: Mario Merz, Giulio Paolini, Mimmo Spadini, Alighiero Boetti” di Antonia Mulas, trasmessa su RAI Tre il 25/12/1984).

Giorgio Andreotta Calò “CITTÀDIMILANO”
Curated by Roberta Tenconi

14 February – 21 July
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 13 February from 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

“Sanguine. Luc Tuymans on Baroque”
Curated by Luc Tuymans

18 October – 25 February
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-8 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 18 October from 10 am

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

View more on Artshell

 

 

Organizzato in collaborazione con M HKA (Museo d’arte contemporanea di Anversa), KMSKA (Museo reale di belle arti di Anversa) e la città di Anversa, il progetto è proposto in una nuova e più ampia versione a Milano fino al 25 febbraio 2019, dopo una prima presentazione nella città belga da giugno e settembre 2018. Tuymans ha concepito un’intensa esperienza visiva composta da più di 80 opere realizzate da 63 artisti internazionali, di cui oltre 25 sono presentate esclusivamente alla Fondazione Prada.

“Sanguine” è una lettura personale del Barocco, costituita da accostamenti inediti e associazioni inaspettate tra lavori di artisti contemporanei e opere di maestri del passato. Senza seguire un rigido ordine cronologico o un criterio strettamente storiografico, Tuymans elude la nozione tradizionale di Barocco e invita a rileggere l’arte seicentesca, ma anche quella contemporanea, mettendone al centro la figura dell’artista e il suo ruolo nella società. Seguendo la lezione di Walter Benjamin, secondo il quale il Barocco segna l’inizio della modernità, Tuymans indaga in questa mostra la ricerca di autenticità, il valore politico della rappresentazione artistica, il turbamento indotto dall’arte, l’esaltazione della personalità dell’autore e la dimensione internazionale della produzione artistica, riconoscendo nel Barocco l’interlocutore privilegiato dell’arte di oggi. “Sanguine” non solo forza i confini abituali della nozione stessa di Barocco, estendendone la durata fino al nostro presente, ma dimostra anche come gli artisti abbiano contribuito, nel corso degli ultimi due secoli, a ridefinirla, dall’accezione negativa attribuita dalla critica d’arte del tardo Settecento, fino alla rivalutazione attuata dal pensiero post-moderno e alla riaffermazione di un’espressività barocca e figurativa nell’arte degli ultimi anni.

Il titolo della mostra – una parola che identifica il colore del sangue, il temperamento violento e ricco di vitalità di una persona, ma anche una tecnica pittorica – suggerisce una molteplicità di prospettive attraverso le quali si possono interpretare le opere esposte in cui convivono violenza e simulazione, crudeltà e teatralizzazione, realismo ed esagerazione, disgusto e meraviglia, terrore ed estasi. Nella visione di Luc Tuymans, Caravaggio – presente in mostra con Fanciullo morso da un ramarro (1595-96) e Davide con la testa di Golia (post 1606) – grazie al realismo psicologico espresso dal suo innovativo linguaggio pittorico, supera per primo la tradizione classica e manierista, incarnando lo spirito dell’artista barocco e la volontà di comunicare con il pubblico attraverso la forza della rappresentazione. Il confronto con Peter Paul Rubens, il pittore di Anversa ritrattista dei potenti e uomo politico, rivela l’ambiguità formale caratteristica della pittura barocca e la complessità delle relazioni che gli artisti hanno sviluppato nell’Europa della Controriforma e dell’insorgere della borghesia mercantile. L’arte barocca del Sei e Settecento è la prima corrente artistica ad assumere una dimensione mondiale, pur mantenendo specificità e caratteri legati alle diverse culture locali e alle sensibilità personali testimoniate in mostra, tra gli altri, da Guido Cagnacci e Andrea Vaccaro, Antoon van Dyck e Jacob Jordaens, Francisco de Zurbarán e Johann Georg Pinsel. All’interno del nostro mondo ancora più globalizzato e connesso, suggestioni, dinamiche e temi tipici dell’arte barocca si possono individuare nei lavori di autori contemporanei lontani tra loro e riuniti da Luc Tuymans in “Sanguine”.

Close
Close

Marcello Maloberti “Sbandata”

30 November – 02 March
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am-7.30 pm (closed 1-3 pm)

Opening 29 November from 7 to 9 pm

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Oliver Osborne “Birth, Education, Leisure, Death”

08 February – 09 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 07 February from 7 pm

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Robert Barry

23 January – 09 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7.00 pm

Opening 23 January from 7 pm

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Omaggio a Mario Schifano. Al principio fu Vero amore

30 November – 09 March
Tuesday – Saturday, 11am-7pm
(aperto:15 aprile / chiuso: 31 marzo, 25 aprile e 1° maggio)

Opening 29 November from 6 pm

Via Tadino 15, 20124

View more on Artshell

“Dear Mario: work, unplug the phone and forget all the troubles of this world. Best regards.”
This letter, dated 29 September 1965 and addressed to Mario Schifano, was signed by Giorgio Marconi on the eve of the inaugural exhibition in his first exhibition space.


True Love was the first painting the Roman artist showed at Studio Marconi in November that same year, alongside works by Valerio Adami, Lucio Del Pezzo and Emilio Tadini.
True Love was also the title of Schifano’s first solo exhibition, again at Marconi’s, just a month later in December 1965. This exhibition was soon followed by others: Inventario con anima e senza anima (November 1966), Tuttestelle (October 1967), Compagni, compagni (December 1968) and Paesaggi TV (December 1970).
It is precisely to this period of Mario Schifano’s career that Fondazione Marconi has turned its attention, offering a tribute to the artist twenty years after his death while also retracing the early stages of his collaboration with Studio Marconi.
After an initial apprenticeship in Informalism, Schifano’s painting emerged in the early 1960s. The first exhibition of his work was in 1959 at Galleria La Salita in Rome, in a group show that included Festa, Angeli, Lo Savio and Uncini. In the exhibition catalogue, Cesare Vivaldi commented: “Mario Schifano is perhaps the most genuine painting talent to appear in Rome since Burri.”
It was the period of his monochromes: highly original paintings in one or two colours that seemed to evoke the zero degree of painting and the arrival at a point of no return.
But that was only a starting point, since as early as 1962 his works became populated with fragments of images and signals from the metropolitan landscape, which shortly made way for new kinds of painting that included images of streets, accidents, nature en plein air, “anaemic landscapes”, “details” and “trees”.
It was during this period that Giorgio Marconi got to know Schifano, having seen his work at Plinio De Martiis’s Galleria la Tartaruga and at Mara Coccia’s. Marconi bought his first Schifano paintings at Federico Quadrani’s Galleria Odyssia, where he also had the opportunity to meet the artist in person.
In the latter half of 1963 Marconi and Schifano established their first collaborative agreements, which in the spring of the following year were formalised in an exclusive contract.
Captivated by his paintings, Marconi called him “a brilliant volcano” and considered him one of the greatest Italian painters of his day.
The partnership between the two ended in 1970, but Marconi’s interest in Schifano continued. He organised exhibitions of his work in 1974,1990 and 2002, as well as two more recent shows held in 2005 and 2006, entitled respectively Schifano 1960-1964. From the Monochromes to the Streets, and Schifano: From Landscape to TV, each accompanied by an important catalogue published by Skira.
This current exhibition aims to reconstruct the exhibitions that took place between 1965 and 1970, beginning on the ground floor with Vero amore (1965), where the main image is of a leafy, robust and vigorous tree, repeated innumerable times in various versions. This is followed by Inventario con anima e senza anima (1966), in which Schifano presented the cycle Futurismo rivisitato, based on the well-known photograph of the Futurist group taken in Paris in 1912, and Tuttestelle (1967), in which spray-painted stars evoke childhood memories, and Schifano began his use of transparent or coloured Perspex sheets to create original veiling effects. Following these is an entire room dedicated to large masterpieces, while the first floor hosts the series Compagni, compagni (1968), inspired by the political events of the day and based on a photograph of Chinese workers or students bearing a hammer and sickle, which Schifano transformed into a media icon. The itinerary ends on the second floor with Paesaggi TV (1970), in which images taken from the television screen have been isolated from their context, elaborated with touches of nitroaniline colour and displayed on emulsified canvas, paper or film.
The exhibition not only intends to pay homage to the artist, but also to celebrate his collaboration with the historic Milan gallery, which at the time had just begun to operate.
The public will therefore be able to see (or see again) works that were presented in Milan in those years (often for the first time), and which still form an integral part of the Marconi collection.
The exhibition itinerary is completed by an extensive selection of repertory materials, including publications, photographs and writings.

 

“Caro Mario lavora, stacca il telefono e dimentica tutte le rogne di questo mondo. Un caro saluto.” La lettera, datata 29 settembre 1965, e indirizzata a Mario Schifano è firmata da Giorgio Marconi alla vigilia della mostra inaugurale del suo primo spazio espositivo.
Vero amore è il primo quadro che l’artista romano espone a Studio Marconi nel novembre dello stesso anno, accanto a opere di Valerio Adami, Lucio Del Pezzo ed Emilio Tadini.

 

Vero amore è anche il titolo della prima personale che egli tiene, sempre da Marconi, appena un mese dopo, nel dicembre 1965.
Seguono nell’ordine, a brevissima distanza: Inventario con anima e senza anima, nel novembre 1966, Tuttestelle, nell’ottobre 1967, Compagni, compagni, nel dicembre 1968, e Paesaggi TV, nel dicembre 1970.

È su questo preciso momento della carriera di Mario Schifano che la Fondazione Marconi concentra l’attenzione dedicandogli un omaggio, a vent’anni dalla morte, e ripercorrendo gli inizi della sua collaborazione con Studio Marconi.
La pittura di Schifano nasce nei primi anni Sessanta, dopo un apprendistato all’insegna di esperienze informali. La sua prima mostra ha luogo alla galleria La Salita di Roma nel 1959, insieme a Festa, Angeli, Lo Savio, Uncini. Nel catalogo della mostra Cesare Vivaldi scrive: “Mario Schifano è forse il talento pittorico più genuino che sia apparso a Roma dopo Burri.”

È il momento dei monocromi, originalissimi quadri verniciati con una sola tinta o due, quasi a voler evocare il grado zero della pittura, il raggiungimento di un punto di non ritorno.
Ma è solo un punto di partenza poiché già dal 1962, le sue opere si popolano di frammenti di immagini e segnali del paesaggio metropolitano, per aprirsi poco dopo a nuove espressioni pittoriche con le strade, gli incidenti, la natura “en plein air”, i “paesaggi anemici”, i “particolari” e gli “alberi”.

Giorgio Marconi entra in contatto con l’artista in questo periodo, dopo averne visto i lavori alla Galleria La Tartaruga di Plinio De Martiis e da Mara Coccia. Acquista le prime opere alla Galleria Odyssia di Federico Quadrani, dove ha l’occasione di conoscerlo di persona.
Nella seconda metà del 1963 stabilisce direttamente con lui i primi accordi di collaborazione, che nella primavera dell’anno seguente vengono formalizzati da un contratto di lavoro in esclusiva.

Profondamente affascinato dai suoi quadri, Marconi lo definisce “un vulcano geniale” e lo considera uno dei più grandi talenti pittorici italiani del suo tempo.
Il sodalizio tra i due finisce nel 1970, ma non si estingue l’interesse per l’artista da parte di Marconi che continua a organizzare mostre di sue opere (nel 1974, 1990, 2002) fino alle più recenti del 2005 e 2006, rispettivamente intitolate Schifano 1960-1964. Dal monocromo alla strada e Schifano. Dal paesaggio alla TV, e corredate da due importanti volumi editi da Skira.

Il percorso espositivo mira oggi a ricostruire le mostre che ebbero luogo dal 1965 al 1970; al piano terra si parte da Vero amore (1965), dove l’immagine principale raffigura un albero frondoso, robusto e vitale, ripetuto innumerevoli volte in versioni differenti; seguono Inventario con anima e senza anima (1966) – in cui Schifano presenta il ciclo Futurismo rivisitato, riprendendo la nota fotografia del gruppo futurista scattata a Parigi nel 1912 – e Tuttestelle (1967) in cui le stelle dipinte a spruzzo evocano ricordi infantili e l’artista comincia a utilizzare calotte di perspex trasparente o colorato per ottenere originali effetti di velatura. Un’intera sala è poi dedicata ai capolavori di grandi dimensioni, mentre al primo piano figurano i Compagni, compagni (1968) ispirati all’attualità politica, in cui la fotografia di alcuni operai o studenti cinesi, muniti di falce e martello, si trasforma in icona mediatica. Il percorso si conclude al secondo piano con i Paesaggi TV (1970) nei quali immagini riprese dallo schermo televisivo, isolate dal contesto e rielaborate con tocchi di colore alla nitro o all’anilina, vengono riportate su tela emulsionata, carta o pellicola.

Se, da un lato, l’obiettivo della mostra è rendere un dovuto omaggio all’artista, dall’altro, si vuol celebrare la sua collaborazione con la storica galleria milanese che aveva da poco iniziato la sua attività.
Il pubblico potrà così vedere (o ri-vedere) opere che furono presentate a Milano in quegli anni – spesso per la prima volta – e che ancor oggi fanno parte integrante della collezione Marconi.

Completa il percorso espositivo un’ampia e variegata selezione di materiali di repertorio, tra pubblicazioni, fotografie, scritti.

 

 

Close
Close

Daniel Murnaghan

08 February – 09 March
Monday – Friday​, ​​11 am-6 pm

Opening 08 February from 7 to 9 pm

Via G. Giulini 5, 20213

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Luigi Ontani “Albericus Belgioiosiae Auroborus”

30 January – 16 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 29 January from 7 to 9 pm

Palazzo Belgioioso
Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Alfredo Aceto “Sequoia 07”

06 February – 16 March
Monday – Friday 10.30 am - 5.30 pm
Saturday 2 - 6 pm

Opening 06 February from 6.30 pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Ruth Proctor, Betty Danon “QUI, DOVE CI INCONTRIAMO”
Norma Mangione Gallery + Galleria Tiziana Di Caro @ Federica Schiavo Gallery

23 January – 16 March
Tuesday – Saturday
12 – 7 pm

Opening 23 January from 6 to 9 pm

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Catherine Parsonage “Notes in Green”

08 February – 21 March
Tuesday​ – Saturday from 11.30 am​-​7.30 pm or by appointment

Opening 08 February from 7 to 9 pm

Via ​A. Stradella, 5​, 20129

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Shannon Ebner “A GRAPHIC TONE”

08 January – 31 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7.30 pm

Opening 07 February from 6.30 pm

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Mario Airò “Il mondo dei fanciulli ridenti”

23 January – 31 March
Tue - Sat 10 am - 7 pm

Opening 23 January from 7 to 9 pm

Viale Vittorio Veneto 30​, 20124

View more on Artshell

Close